Tag Archives: History

From the Bookshelf: 1919, Eve L. Ewing

For whatever alignment of the stars, with the Black Lives Maters protests after George Floyds’ death, I happened to read a cartoon by an African American cartoonist which dropped the phrase “Red Summer”. I did not know the reference. Then, … Continue reading

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From the Bookshelf: Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series

In order to understand the Red Summer of 1919, we must understand the great migration of African-Americans from the southern states to the norther cities. In order to understand this relocation of people, race, and culture, we must understand Jim … Continue reading

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From the Bookshelf: My Bondage and My Freedom, by Fredrick Douglas

My first memory of a peer of African-American descent comes from elementary school. Sammy. That is about it. We grew up in tract-home, suburban, white, middle-class, college educated, California. Sammy was athletic. OJ Simpson and Muhammad Ali were sports heroes. … Continue reading

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Dept. of Alternative Facts: History

history (n): the narrative of events, usually written by the victor and those in power, easily skewed to a specific view point on the events, especially when working with a set of alternative facts Black Lives Matter rallies, marches, kneel-ins, … Continue reading

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From the Bookshelf: Hillbilly Elegy, A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, J. D. Vance

In my project of reading-books-I-already-have-then-moving-them-along, J. D. Vance’s memoir, Hillbilly Elegy, was next in the stack.  This came to me by way of my mother-in-law, whom I believe read it for her book club.  She then passed it on to … Continue reading

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From the Bookshelf: My Years in Communist China, by Eva Diao

Every once in a while, I find a book on my shelf which I had forgotten about for a couple of decades. After those not-too-light-reading texts by Friedman and Chomsky, I skimmed for something less taxing. My eye settled on … Continue reading

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Theatre Review(s): “All the Way” and “Henry V”

  I have commented before that having Shakespeare’s history plays, of Roman and English leaders, I do not need much more to understand history and politics.  A month or so back, we saw a new play, All the Way, at … Continue reading

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Theatre Review: Henry VI, Part 1

If Shakespeare wrote poorly, Henry VI, Part 1 would demonstrate this. Harold Bloom (The Invention of the Human) attributed this to Shakespeare cutting his teeth in the theatre, as Henry VI, Part 1 is one of his earlier plays. Possibly, Shakespeare was … Continue reading

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Art of the Gospels, Part 10, Jesus’ Conflict with the Jewish Leaders

The prophecies which Jesus had been making regarding his arrest, death, and resurrection become actions as Passover approaches.  First he must enter Jerusalem.  Triumphal entries of kings was a tradition in Rome.  About 100 hundred triumphal arches were errected in … Continue reading

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Art of the Gospels, Part 9, Jesus’ Ministry Around Perea

Jesus had been performing healing throughout his ministry. At times, people seeking him out appeared more interested in relief from their afflictions than to hear his teaching. These ranged from elimination of life long conditions, such as blindness and not … Continue reading

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