Frescoes of Paul’s Ministry, Part 11: Stoning of Paul at Lystra

Stoning of Paul at Lystra, Cesare Mariani Acts 14:19 - 20

Stoning of Paul at Lystra, Cesare Mariani, Acts 14:19 – 20

Acts 14:19 – 20

Then some of the Jews came from Antioch and Iconium and won the crowd over.  They stoned Paul and dragged him outside the city, thinking he was dead.  But, after the disciples had gathered around him, he got up and went back into the city.  The next day he and Barnabas left for Derbe.

P1020144

What’s Going On?

Paul and Barnabas’s message about a new family, a new society, challenges the status of the Jewish leaders, Roman civil and religious authorities.

The Jewish leader persuade “the multitudes”, certainly other Jews, and possibly the citizens of Lystra who have made sacrifices to Paul and Barnabas, that Paul and Barnabas must be stopped.

The mob takes over, drags them out of the city, and stones Paul.

Paul does not die, but after the mob leaves gets up and goes back into Lystra with the other disciples.  

They leave for Derbe, a nearby city, the next day.

What Are We Seeing?

Paul has fallen to the ground.

Several men drag him by his red cloak.

The mob lifts up stones and are about the hurl these at him.

Other men, namely the one with the white cloak in the center, talk.  Are these the Jewish leaders from Antioch and Iconium who have persuaded the mob to act?

The city walls are in the background, with smoke from the sacrificial altar rising in front of the Temple of Jupiter.

Inspiration:  

When others have attacked you, what helped you to continue on with your mission?

Quote – Fresco 11

St. Paul sacrificed his own life, devoting himself without reserve to the ministry of reconciliation, of the Cross, which is salvation for us all.

Pope Benedict XVI

About hermitsdoor

Up here in the mountains, we have a saying, "You can't get there from here", which really means "We wouldn't go the trouble to do that". Another concept is that "If you don't know, we ain't telling." For the rest, you'll have to read between the lines.
This entry was posted in Travel and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

This Hermit's Door is Open: Step in & Share Your Opinion

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s