Frescoes of Paul’s Ministry, Part 6: Saul Flees Damascus

Saul Flees Damascus, Guglielmo De Sanctis Acts 9:23 - 25

Saul Flees Damascus, Guglielmo De Sanctis, Acts 9:23 – 25

Acts 9:23 – 25

After many days had gone by, the Jews conspired to kill him, but Saul learned of their plan.  Day and night they kept close watch on the city gates in order to kill him.  But his followers took him by night and lowered him in a basket through an opening in the wall.

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I will have to admit that Saul’s prayerful upward gaze and hands, along with his halo are a bit cheesy here.  I would have him hustling away with his eyes on escape, not supplication.  I do like the basket held out the window, the moon in the clouds, and the red glow from the city gate in the background.

When researching this series of frescos, one of the comments that I came across explaining why little information existed on them was their inferior quality compared to the original frescos and existing mosaics in the basilica.  The original frescos were damaged or destroyed during a fire in the early 19th century.  The prior painter was considered of high quality.  Of, course, the artists working on the rebuilding of the basilica were also going back historically to artistic styles from the prior four centuries, thus do not stand out as making the stories their own.  This fresco probably exemplifies this dilemma of nostalgia marginalizing the quality… at least until nostalgia becomes hip and trending.  Then we call it retro.

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About hermitsdoor

Up here in the mountains, we have a saying, "You can't get there from here", which really means "We wouldn't go the trouble to do that". Another concept is that "If you don't know, we ain't telling." For the rest, you'll have to read between the lines.
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One Response to Frescoes of Paul’s Ministry, Part 6: Saul Flees Damascus

  1. Your commentary on the painting made me smile. I hear you.

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